top of page
  • Writer's pictureJessica Trainor

Navigating the World of Intimacy & Sex After Childhood Sexual Abuse: A Journey of Healing


I’m so glad you’re here. 


If you've landed here; chances are you've experienced childhood sexual abuse, and are now navigating the complexities of intimacy as a survivor. First and foremost, I want you to know that you are not alone. The path to healing can be challenging, but it's also incredibly empowering. As a survivor myself, as well as a therapist who has walked alongside many survivors on this journey, I understand the intricacies involved in reclaiming intimacy and rebuilding trust.


Let's talk about intimacy. It's a word that carries so much weight and meaning, especially for those who have experienced trauma. Intimacy isn't just about physical closeness; it's about vulnerability, trust, and connection – things that may have been shattered by past experiences. As survivors, it's natural to feel hesitant or even terrified at the thought of opening up to someone in such a profound way.


One of the most important things to remember is that healing is not linear. Some days will feel like a step forward, while others might feel like a step back. And that's okay. Healing is messy, give yourself permission to take things at your own pace.


Self-exploration is important and so empowering! What does being intimate with yourself look like now? What do you want it to look like? What does sexuality mean to you? How do you want sex to play a role in the relationship you have with yourself? What do you like? What do you not like? Explore this part of yourself. 


Self-compassion is essential. Be gentle with yourself. Healing from childhood sexual abuse is a journey - practice self-care, whatever that looks like for you – whether it's journaling, cuddling up with a pet, spending time in nature, engaging in a hobby you love or seeking support from a loved one. 


Communication is key. Learning to communicate your needs, boundaries, and fears with your partner(s) can be incredibly empowering. It's okay to set boundaries and take things slow. Your comfort should always come first.


Seeking professional help can also make a world of difference. Therapy can provide a safe space to explore your feelings, process trauma, and learn coping strategies to navigate intimacy. It is normal that trauma has made this part of your life so confusing and scary, and it is okay to want that to look different now. You are deserving of a healthy relationship with sex and intimacy, both with yourself and someone else. 


You are worthy of love and connection. You deserve happiness and fulfillment in all aspects of your life, including intimacy and sex. 



3 views

Comments


Commenting has been turned off.
bottom of page